Video Literary Terms Lesson

Lesson Title: Using Video to Teach Key Literary Terms

DOWNLOAD PDF: Literary Terms Lesson Plan pdf icon

KEY LINK TO VIDEOS: https://tyleredtech541.wordpress.com/artifacts/literary-analysis-videos/

Grade/Age Level: 10th– 12th  grade

Subject Area: English (especially Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate

Time allotted for the lesson: Nine weeks and then as reinforcement

In this lesson, the learners will learn and use core concepts of literary analysis with video support instead of simple terms and handouts. These videos could be refined and potentially be replaced with student developed video projects to make them even more relevant to particular schools.

Common Core Curriculum Standards met in this lesson:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.10  By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Instructional Objectives (SWBAT+ Student will be able to):

Learn the core literary terms and be able to initially know their validity and importance when evaluating and analyzing literature.

Actively use the terms in reading journals, discussion, presentation, and analysis.

Actively identify examples of these terms in context and in assessment (including during AP practice and actual testing scenarios).

Identify these terms in their own settings (movies, TV, personal reading, etc)

Present evidence of their knowledge in project-based settings (infographics, videos, sketch/visual notetaking, blogs, timelines, etc.

Instructional Procedures

Lesson Set: Students will receive a lesson each week via Schoology. Students can elect to go at their own pace, but these lessons will coincide with the course’s regular activities, so it is recommended that students go at the week pace.

CORE LINK: https://tyleredtech541.wordpress.com/artifacts/literary-analysis-videos/

Techniques and Activities

Get a journal (Composition book or Moleskine type journal) to use with this example. Students may also develop a digital journal (Evernote or blog) approach to use with this. The completed work will be useful when studying for the AP exam or for analysis. Keeping a Reading Journal

Possess a copy of the AP/CP (college prep) literary terms (digital and/or hard copy)

We will review note taking approaches. (Here is a link to a video on the concept of visual notetaking:)

This is a great place for students to take notes in their reading journal (separate from the literary terms journal

Have access to a computer, tablet, or even a smart phone.

Relative advantage:  My students tend to struggle with some of these terms, especially in timed environments. By providing video support as well as a journaling approach, students can build and reinforce knowledge of these terms to mastery, thus saving them time in analysis and also on timed essays and tests.

Grouping: Students may partner or conduct these approaches individually. Teachers may also elect to do these assignments as “Warm-ups” during the week in order to provide another voice.

Direct Lesson Plan: Instructors should consider using these the first day of the school week if possible.

Here is the independent YouTube link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PL9uVGWre9zFbFfZwABlWxbdEezkO_BN1f&v=U_pxfifB6Co

Assignment (Video) 1: Intro to Literary Analysis (Video 1)
Students will be learning about alliteration, allusion, foreshadowing, hyperbole, metaphor, onomatopoeia, and simile.

Step 1: Take notes on these videos (instructor may have already reviewed these in a different setting, depending on the course). Students should consider using a journal (digital or print) for this assignment.

Step 2: Using the TED-ED approach provided, answer the questions @ the end of the video.

Assignment (Video) 2: Literary Devices (Video 2)
Students will be learning alliteration, assonance, similes/metaphors, personification, and onomatopoeia.

Step 1: View this video either as a part of the class or separately.

Step 2: Project-Based Assignment: Develop and create a video with the examples used to potentially replace the video currently used. Here is a student model from a previous class to use as a guide.

Assignment (Video) 3: The Art of Metaphor
Students will be learning about metaphor via a visual/graphic animated approach.

Step 1: Students should take notes from the viewing and be prepared to discuss these either in class or in a discussion board setting.

Step 2: Complete the TED-ED assignment “The Art of the Metaphor” supplemental link: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/jane-hirshfield-the-art-of-the-metaphorStep 3: This is a good place for instructors to do a journal check!

Assignment (Video) 4: Paradox
This is a mid-term approach, so consider it a major assessment.

Students will be learning about paradox (the deepest form of irony). This is going AHEAD of the irony videos to help students understand all four concepts. We are already dealing in paradox in some form, so the term needs to be “released”.

Step 1: In class or via discussion board, discuss the connection to math and science. Students should continue to build their digital or print journals with the information collected from the discussion.

Step 2: Participate in a Socratic Seminar approach (digital or in-class) (have students view this video before coming to class). Students will provide four questions based on the handouts provided concerning paradox in literary analysis. Download Literary Terms Socratic Seminar 2013 and the General Themes in Literature 2014 handouts for support of this portion of the assignment. If done online, contribute two or the four questions to the discussion board and answer two of the posts provided.

Step 3: Discuss the connection to math and science so that students see the multicurricular critical thinking process in place either in the literary analysis notebook or in a class discussion.Step 4: Students should provide ten examples of paradox from various sources to add to their literary analysis notebook.

Assignment (Video) 5: Situational Irony

Students will be learning about the basics of irony and the misconception of irony. Students will be focusing on situational irony.

Step 1: Students should take notes.

Step 2: Students should provide five to ten examples of situational irony.

Step 3: Students will complete the TED-ED assignment or a PBL assignment of their own choosing to show understanding of this concept.http://ed.ted.com/lessons/situational-irony-the-opposite-of-what-you-think-christopher-warner

Assignment (Video) 6: Verbal Irony/Sarcasm
Students will be learning about verbal irony and sarcasm. Sarcasm will be discussed in class prior to introduction of this concept. (for fully online courses, a support video or teacher made video will accompany this lesson).

Step 1: Students should take notes.

Step 2: Students should seek three example of verbal irony (without sarcasm) and five examples of verbal irony and sarcasm. They will share these either in class or on discussion board.

Step 3: Students will complete the TED-ED assignment: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-is-verbal-irony-christopher-warner#discussion

Instructors: This is another good time to do a notebook check

Assignment (Video) 7: Dramatic Irony
Students will be learning about dramatic irony (as well as  its relationship with tension and suspense). Students will review all three aspects of irony.

Step 1: Students should take notes.

Step 2: Students should seek five to ten examples of dramatic irony from either their classroom literature or their own viewing and reading.

Step 3: Students will complete the TED-ED assignment or a PBL assignment of their own choosing to show understanding of this concept.Lesson site: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/in-on-a-secret-that-s-dramatic-irony-christopher-warner

Step 4: Review Socratic Seminar:  Participate in a Socratic Seminar approach (digital or in-class) reflecting on examples of irony in their reading and/or from their video lessons) Students will provide four questions from the matrix provided in the links in this box.

Download Literary Terms Socratic Seminar 2013 and the General Themes in Literature 2014 handouts for support of this portion of the assignment. If done online, contribute two or the four questions to the discussion board and answer two of the posts provided.

Assignment (Video) 8: Figurative Language

Students will be using a visual approach & connection to alliteration, personification, onomatopoeia, understatement, and  hyperbole.This functions as a bit of review.

Step 1: PBL assignment: Using Prezi, Bubbl, Tumblr, infographic program, Evernote, sketch note or similar approach to make a visual connection to these approaches.

Step 2: Students should continue to develop their note journals.

Assignment (Video) 9 and 10: Synecdoche/Metonymy

Students will learn the definition and important elements of synecdoche and metonymy (use both videos here)

Step 1: Students should copy the key definitions from the video into their journal.

Step 2: Students will be looking for five to ten examples of synecdoche not found in the video and showing these in the journal or submitting for assignment.

Step 3: Students will be looking for five to eight examples of metonymy and then will make a chart/table taking five of their examples of synecdoche and then showing five examples of metonymy as a side-by-side guide.

Assignment 10: Formative Assessment

Step 1: Students will submit their journals for final evaluation.

Step 2: Students will be given a formative assignment using both a AP context test using the terms covered, as well as a standard multiple choice test on vocabulary to test mastery of the words provided.

Adaptations for special learners:

Students need to keep these handouts or make sure they maintain the link to these assignments. Students who are struggling with these assignments will be assigned student mentors and also will have opportunities for instructor tutoring.  Handouts can be copied into the Open Dyslexic font to assist those students with sight issues read the materials better.

Lesson Closure: This is an ongoing lesson: A second series of these videos for other terms could be added for second semester, especially for AP instruction.

Supplemental Activities: Pre-AP/AP students will be asked to construct a PBL (Problem Based Learning) project that will help not only show mastery of these terms but also develop more artifacts to boost across the class learning.

Extension and remediation: Remediation will occur based on assignments.

Assessment/Evaluation :

At least three journal checks (formative)

Successful use of the terms in context during the course of other activities.

Literary Terms test (summative) at the end of the ten weeks (definitions and in context).

Use of the terms within AP Practice assignments.

Completion of TED-ED assignments (where applicable)

Learner Products (What artifact(s) or products will result from the lesson?

A journal that can be used for studying these terms in the future. Students will be encouraged to add to the journal. Students will also have a multimedia presentation to use for a student portfolio.

Additional References:

AP English Language and Composition Course Details. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse/ap-english-language-and-composition/course-details

AP English Literature and Composition Course Overview – Advanced Placement – AP Exam. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse/ap-english-literature-and-composition

Roblyer, M. D., & Doering, A. (2012). Integrating educational technology into teaching. (6th ed.). Pearson Education Inc.

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